Woo hoo! Brand new car smell!

Buying your very first new car is a fabulous way to start a new year. But I’ve such a lot to learn- having a new car comes with a lot of new rules and I’m not 100% that I understand them all just yet. Luckily I found out I can use my preferred Ringwood mechanic, because I’d be lost without him!

To begin with, I thought I had to get the manufacturer to do all the servicing up to a certain point. Apparently having someone work on your car who isn’t registered to repair it can void your warranty and you need someone who is licensed, to fit the very extremely particular standards that the very serious manufacturer insists upon.

I’m assured that this is a good thing.

My mechanic has serviced both my rides since I first started driving, and I was worried that I’d have to find a new mechanic to provide a quality car service. Ringwood has some good choices but I had to find someone I could trust. All it took was one bad experience with a dodgy mechanic who charged me for a load of repairs that were never carried out. So after doing some groundwork, I found a place that have like, a huge promise to consumers, that they won’t repair anything until you sign off on it. They’re total professionals, and I’m telling you, I’d be the last to know the difference in the way my car runs until it is way too late, so that trust is really really important.

Apparently my new car is a great choice too.

I feel chuffed to have that pat on the back from the experts, even though I spent more than I was going to. Right now, I’m planning out my first long distance trip- something I could never have done with confidence with my old wheels…I’m headed to Robe, South Australia for a week and a half away.

Why the Big Sell doesn’t scare me (any more)

This morning I received an email from my brother in law Jack. He’d been talking to my partner about  our recent decision to purchase our new home and didn’t want me to miss a beat when it came to the sale. My partner mentioned needing to find a good property conveyancing team in Melbourne but to be honest, everything was going in one ear and out the other. He’d had to fly to the states to pull off a work contract right in the middle of the sale and he’d clearly called in the extra hands where he imagined they’d help.

“Grace, Jase has told me how stressed out you (both) are about the sale. I know you’ve been really frazzled by the idea of leaving, and I know it’s only going to get busier for you in the next few weeks, so I just wanted to help where I can.

Jase told me you’re at the stage of needing property conveyancing. Melbourne agents move fast, and I know someone that can really help. It’s like having a translator!  But I also wanted to break down a few things about the whole process as well so you can make ends of it before you reach out.

So here it is.

Bless him, this email went on in great detail to explain the key steps of selling including the section 32 statement. It was probably one of the most helpful things anyone has done for me over email. Jack had sold his home only a few months earlier, just last year and we were lucky to learn off the back of his experience. Skyping Jase later in the afternoon, I realised how much he’d been affected by being away when I saw the relief in his face, after I told him that I’d been able to make contact with a conveyancer and had an appointment tomorrow.

I feel much more secure knowing  I can ask all these crazy questions about our sale tomorrow. Suddenly, things don’t seem so overwhelming and challenging any more.

Paperwork, Unfamiliar to Many

BIG plot twist tonight on The Great Australian Trade-Off, as the tradies were forced to contend with property management. It’s by far the least ‘practical’ task they’ve had so far, after all the other weeks were about fixing things and creating…more things. But it’s week four now. The weak ones have been weeded out, and there’s nowhere left to hide from the judges.

Yes, I’m a little bit addicted, but paperwork is my jam. I do it all day at work, so seeing someone else put through it on national television is just amazing. Just think of all the conveyancing lawyers who’ll be watching this episode, yelling at their TV screens as the tradies mix up their sale of land act with the mortgage payments. It gets pretty complicated, though, and you don’t realise until you actually have to sort out this stuff for a living. Property conveyancing is a whole lot of admin, and if you’re not organised, you might as well just do another job. Like real estate agency. Ha! Burn!

Anyway, the tradies had to do all sorts of conveyancing and property shenanigans, and it was clear that they were outside their comfort zone. Makes sense, though…if these people want to run their own businesses, they need to learn to sift through paperwork. People get pretty upset when it comes to payday and you’ve lost their tax file numbers, or you need to find a receipt for work completed seven months ago and it’s somewhere in a massive pile next to your desk.

Of course, as per usual they had an actual conveyancing expert in the tent. A professional, I mean…not that they have an Elwood conveyancing professional in there every single week, no matter the task. That would’ve been silly when they’re fixing boat propellers. But wow, they went there. A whole week on paperwork, and now I am hooked.

-Harley

The Old Friendly Home Advice Agency

My days of violence are behind me, I like to think. I was quite the firecracker back in my youth, and Wagga Wonga Primary School knew it. Hattie Borden made the mistake of making fun of my stockings, so I knocked out six of her teeth. It beat the previous record (when Archie Mason knocked out four teeth in a freak draughts incident) by a whole two teeth. I was quite proud of that until I grew up a bit and realised that there are better things to be remembered for.

And while property advocates in Melbourne are now running around everywhere, I like to think that I at least had SOME part in helping the industry along. My pretty older sister wanted to be a real estate secretary (women couldn’t be actual agents back in those days). At that time I adored my sister and it was my life goal to do whatever she did. No internet back in those days, obviously, If you wanted to buy a new home, your options were limited to looking in the newspapers and having an estate agent TELL you what it looked like. Then you could go and look at the property yourself, of course. My first ‘business’ was Helena Naismith’s Friendly Home Advice Agency. Think of a buyers advocate, but a lot less formal, you didn’t have to pay for the privilege and I had no real training or expertise. People would contact me, I’d run along to the place where they wanted to buy and I’d give them a full run-down of the lovely houses I found, preferably over tea. I only ever got about eight customers, mostly friends and family (then that one fellow who fancied me and was using it as an excuse for us to chat). Anyway, I did that for a while before my pretty sister moved into her nursing training. Naturally, I dropped the buyers advocacy stuff and took up full-time veterinary services, with a focus on disabled rabbits.

And lo and behold, decades later, look at all the property advocates! Trustworthy, Melbourne-based…and I can’t really prove that the original idea was mine. Still, I like to think the spirit of Helena Naismith’s Friendly Home Advice Agency lives on, in the modern era.

-Helena

Dry Needling, For the ‘City Folk’

When the snowman brings the snow, well…you just might like to know: he puts a great big smile upon somebody’s face.

Not here though. We’re sadly relegated to a hot and dusty Christmas in the middle of absolutely nowhere. Here we sit on the edge of the outback, in a town of a hundred, isolated from anywhere interesting. You’d think since everyone knows everybody else’s name, we’d all get together for a big old Christmas party or something. Nope! Mrs Renshaw doesn’t even decorate the town hall, even though she keeps a draconian watch over absolutely everything else that goes on in there.

It’s just SO provincial. The biggest news of the entire year was Sheila Bryant going off to the big smoke in Sydney, doing a dry needling course. Everyone in town reacted like she’d come back and started brewing potions, and casting spells. Dry needling is ‘new’ and ‘fangled’ and ‘new-fangled’, it would seem, so the people of Jurumbee are suspicious of it. Some people here still get their water from a well and think that the internet is a secret government plot to steal your soul, so the fact that Sheila is now making a career out of something they’ve never even heard of is scaring everyone stiff.

I wonder how long it’ll be before Jurumbee gets dry needling? I’m going to say…never. Like, not at all. I was shocked when we actually got internet, although it’s still deathly dial-up speeds. It takes the nearest internet technician two hours door-to-door to get here and fix any problems, and yet there are so many that I’ve basically become the town’s resident technology fixer-upper.

But dry needling, eh? I bet Mrs Renshaw thinks that it’s some kind of advanced bush magic. Doesn’t matter that Sheila Renshaw is one of the only people around here with some sense. I should take a leaf and move to Sydney. I’d surely be casting off the trust of the community, but…whatever. Do dry needling courses do group bookings in Sydney? We could get the whole town in on it, make it our first actual community event. Now wouldn’t THAT be something…

-Carlos